Interviewing Part 5: After the Interview

Anne Weeks Etiquette, Interviews, Other Leave a Comment

Anne Weeks

Anne Macleod Weeks is a graduate of Lawrence and Villanova Universities. She has been an educational administrator and English teacher for 38 years, specializing in the area of college admission. Ms. Weeks has been a leader in the college admission and Advanced Placement arenas and has published on pertinent educational topics in a variety of national papers and journals. She currently resides in Nova Scotia, Canada.
Anne Weeks

Latest posts by Anne Weeks (see all)

Following up after a job interview

Follow Up! Follow Up! Follow up!

 

You have survived your interview, and you feel great about how well you were prepared.

Time to celebrate? Not yet!

Many a candidate has ruined a good interview by forgetting about an appropriate follow-up.

 

What should you do?

 

Get a business card from everyone    Business Cards
Be sure to get a business card from everyone with whom you interview.
 
Email Follow Up after Job Interview    Email
Send a thank you email to everyone with whom you met, as soon as possible. Short and to the point, reaffirming your interest, you should remind them of your strengths that make you a good fit for the job. Be confident and hopeful. Avoid arrogance and entitlement. Try to mention something specific you discussed with each person.

Write a handwritten letter to follow-up on a job interview    Handwritten Note

This may seem “old school”, but it can make you stand out from others vying for the job. Are you used to writing authentic, handwritten, thank you notes? Do you have personalized stationery? If so, this can be a good option for you. Choose to do this if you want to convey a more traditional approach (this could be valuable depending on the culture of the organization) or if you have a clever/creative approach (again, if appropriate for the organization’s culture). If this is a comfortable approach for you, bring the notecards with you, so you can write the notes immediately after the interview. You can then mail them close by or drop them at the receptionist’s desk.

Getting an Answer:

If you don’t hear anything within the timeframe the interviewer outlined, it is fine to check with Human Resources. A gentle note reinforcing your interest and asking if there is any additional information needed is appropriate. If you are told the process is progressing and you remain a candidate, you may check in every 7-10 days to show diligence and follow-through, which are valuable qualities! Never sound demanding or annoying – always maintain a professional tone. You are staying in touch because you are excited about the opportunity!

Once You Get the Offer:

Be sure to write an email or note to anyone who has helped you in the process, telling them how much you value their support and confidence in you. You have now laid a foundation for building your professional network, and you want to continue to nurture these connections throughout your career.

Now – it is finally TIME TO CELEBRATE!

 

Beyond The U is Proud of Your Accomplishment!

 

The following two tabs change content below.

Anne Weeks

Anne Macleod Weeks is a graduate of Lawrence and Villanova Universities. She has been an educational administrator and English teacher for 38 years, specializing in the area of college admission. Ms. Weeks has been a leader in the college admission and Advanced Placement arenas and has published on pertinent educational topics in a variety of national papers and journals. She currently resides in Nova Scotia, Canada.

Latest posts by Anne Weeks (see all)