How Does a Liberal Arts Degree Prepare Me for the Job Market?

Anne Weeks After College, Other Leave a Comment

Anne Weeks

Anne Macleod Weeks is a graduate of Lawrence and Villanova Universities. She has been an educational administrator and English teacher for 38 years, specializing in the area of college admission. Ms. Weeks has been a leader in the college admission and Advanced Placement arenas and has published on pertinent educational topics in a variety of national papers and journals. She currently resides in Nova Scotia, Canada.
Anne Weeks

Latest posts by Anne Weeks (see all)

With STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) being in the all the news stories, is it still possible to get a job, in this techcentric world, with a Liberal Arts degree?

How often has someone said to you, “What kind of job can you get as an English major, other than teaching?”  

Surprisingly, many companies are looking for just that – a Liberal Arts major!

Why?

 

The Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) defines liberal education as “an approach to learning that empowers individuals and prepares them to deal with complexity, diversity, and change. It provides students with broad knowledge of the wider world (e.g. science, culture, and society) as well as in-depth study in a specific area of interest. A liberal education helps students develop a sense of social responsibility, as well as strong and transferable intellectual and practical skills, such as communication, analytical and problem-solving skills, and a demonstrated ability to apply knowledge and skills in real-world settings.”

 

In short, Liberal Arts majors know how to THINK.

 

More than 75% of employers recommend a liberal arts education for its flexibility, creativity, critical thinking and strong communications skills (AASCU).

 

Lucy Ewing, in UniversityParent, lists the qualities Liberal Arts majors demonstrate which make them sought after employees:

  • Able to Think Critically/Problem Solve

Liberal Arts majors are required to study in a broad array of subjects, giving them the ability to contextualize and to draw from both historical and contemporary sources when facing a problem.

  • Able to Communicate Effectively

One of the skills many companies complain about is their employees’ inability to write and to speak well. Liberal Arts majors are required to write extensively and to give oral presentations.

  • Ability to Collaborate

Liberal Arts majors are used to smaller classes and seminars where they work in groups and refine their interpersonal skills.

  • Able to Access and Synthesize Information

Liberal Arts majors are required to do extensive research. Today’s employers are looking for people who can “just figure it out for themselves,” according to Harvard professor, Tony Wagner (7 Survival Skills – what companies want today).

  • Able to Imagine and to be Creative

Liberal Arts majors are exposed to such a wide variety of ideas, they become lifelong learners who seek new ideas and trends. They have developed an interest beyond a single field and enjoy looking for connections between disciplines. They are readers.

 

As a Liberal Arts major, the job field is more open. You can look into almost any industry for opportunities to build a career.

 

Where to start? Sign on for Beyond the U’s Career Academy, where you will be personally guided to careers that best suit your needs and skills.

BTU will keep you from being one of the 80% who fail to find a job upon graduation from college. Success is right around the corner – Why Wait?

The following two tabs change content below.

Anne Weeks

Anne Macleod Weeks is a graduate of Lawrence and Villanova Universities. She has been an educational administrator and English teacher for 38 years, specializing in the area of college admission. Ms. Weeks has been a leader in the college admission and Advanced Placement arenas and has published on pertinent educational topics in a variety of national papers and journals. She currently resides in Nova Scotia, Canada.

Latest posts by Anne Weeks (see all)