When Does My Workday End? Beyond The U

When Does My Workday End?

Anne Weeks After College, Etiquette, Other Leave a Comment

Anne Weeks

Anne Macleod Weeks is a graduate of Lawrence and Villanova Universities. She has been an educational administrator and English teacher for 38 years, specializing in the area of college admission. Ms. Weeks has been a leader in the college admission and Advanced Placement arenas and has published on pertinent educational topics in a variety of national papers and journals. She currently resides in Nova Scotia, Canada.
Anne Weeks

Latest posts by Anne Weeks (see all)

You scored the job of your dreams, and you want to convince your boss you are indispensable.

You want a long career with the company and the chance to advance quickly and confidently.

So, you convince yourself you need to be available at any time, during and beyond work hours, to establish your value, unequivocally.

But, now, you’re exhausted and resentful.

When you don’t have good boundaries between your work and personal lives, your health and performance suffer.”

Travis Bradberry, author of Emotional Intelligence 2.0, shares in Inc.com, the 6 Things You Don’t Owe Your Boss (Bradberry). 

Bradberry says, When you don’t have good boundaries between your work and personal lives, your health and performance suffer.” And, it isn’t just about responding to emails during off-hours. It is about setting boundaries and learning to say no to your boss.

Here are the 6 things Bradberry encourages you to value:

  • Your Health: Stress, Sleep Deprivation, Lack of Exercise. The negative impact on your health will affect your performance. You need a plan! Build ways to destress, to get enough sleep, and to exercise (even just a walk at lunch), and most importantly, be consistent in sticking to your plan.

When Does My Workday End? Beyond The U

 

  • Your Sanity: Feeling overwhelmed? Can’t wait to say TGIF? You need your sanity, and the best way to maintain your sanity is to have time off. You need to devote time to hobbies, friends, family. If your boss wants you to work overtime or on the weekend, assess how you are feeling, think about your needs for that healthy life, and then know it is okay to say no or to suggest a modification to the request.

youre insane gif

 

  • Your Identity: Don’t let work become your identity. If you find yourself defining yourself by work, it is time to branch out and find other things to fuel your soul. Volunteer, join a club, learn a new skill, play a sport – whatever will broaden your experience and round out your life.

zoolander who am I

 

  • Your Contacts: The contacts you make through work are yours and yours alone. They are contacts you have developed through hard work. You can share them, but always remember you own them.

30 rock jack and liz high five

 

  • Your Integrity: This is an essential part of you. Never compromise your values. If you are asked to do something that will bring your integrity into question, just say no. It is better to part ways than to damage your reputation.

hey-arnold-swept-under-the-rug

 

  • Your Family: Whether you are married, have children, are single – family comes in all forms. Allowing work to come between these vital relationships will only result in stress and regret. Always carve out quality time for family – it is important to both your health and sanity.

arrested development hug

 

A healthy and productive employee is invaluable. Setting boundaries will allow you to be that indispensable employee – the one who can be trusted to get the job done while staying content. 

Have the confidence to plan and to say no – it is your right!

The following two tabs change content below.

Anne Weeks

Anne Macleod Weeks is a graduate of Lawrence and Villanova Universities. She has been an educational administrator and English teacher for 38 years, specializing in the area of college admission. Ms. Weeks has been a leader in the college admission and Advanced Placement arenas and has published on pertinent educational topics in a variety of national papers and journals. She currently resides in Nova Scotia, Canada.

Latest posts by Anne Weeks (see all)